Explore the latest interactive exhibits, experiences, and learning opportunities at miSci.

Be the Astronaut

Be the Astronaut

Opens May 7, 2022

Be the Astronaut is a fun, interactive adventure where you are in control as you launch a rocket, pilot a spaceship, and drive a rover in space!

The exhibit guides you as you discover the solar system first hand with the help of virtual astronauts as you land on multiple worlds, including the Moon, Mars, and Jupiter. Designed with the help of NASA experts, the exhibition is fun for the whole family and takes STEM learning into outer space.

Throughout each stage of the exhibit, you have your own crew of virtual content experts. These digital characters help you learn what’s needed to fly a spaceship, pilot a lander, and drive a surface rover. Then they are with you as you climb into the simulators to actually perform these feats, in a thrilling narrative adventure spanning the solar system.

In each space capsule, a massive 70” monitor serves as the ‘windshield,’ giving you a first-person view of your adventures. Touch-screens and an industrial-quality joystick put you in command. During missions, the entire cockpit comes alive with animated lighting effects, game visuals, and sounds that make you believe you ARE an astronaut.

Design Zone

Design Zone

On view in the Jane Golub Gallery

Design Zone is a new interactive permanent exhibition that highlights the importance of science and mathematical thinking in areas critical to building creativity and innovation: art, music, and engineering and presents the creative concepts behind the processes and tools needed to create a successful design. What does it take to create an addictive and fun videogame? How many beats per second does a DJ need to get bodies moving on the dance floor? What goes behind creating a roller coaster or a skate park that produces the most fun and biggest thrills? Discover the secrets behind how videogame developers, music producers, roller coaster designers, and other creative problem solvers do what they do.

WGY: Radio’s Laboratory Celebrates Its Centennial

WGY: Radio’s Laboratory Celebrates Its Centennial

On view through May 8, 2022

WGY: Radio’s Laboratory Celebrates Its Centennial presents more than fifty rare and historical photographs, ranging in date from the early 1920s to 1980, documenting the history of WGY, a groundbreaking radio station founded in 1922 and still operating today in the New York Capital Region.

WGY is the tenth oldest commercial radio station in the United States, the creator of the first broadcast drama, and a pioneer in the use of sound effects. It was the first affiliate of the NBC national network and regularly featured top national entertainers. WGY was also one of the stations that helped to unite the country during World War II by providing important news to the entire nation.

Photographs on view include an October 1926 image of Harry Houdini appearing on WGY to promote a performance in Albany, one of his last before his death a few weeks later on Halloween; and a 1929 image of the famous aviator Amelia Earhart, who visited the WGY studio to give a talk and read letters to Admiral Richard Byrd’s Antarctic Expedition.

Seeing Ourselves: From Silhouette to Selfie

Seeing Ourselves: From Silhouette to Selfie

On view through April 24, 2022

Imagine not knowing the look of their own face. For most people throughout history, this was the rule rather than the exception. It was only through the development of technology that we reached the modern day, where seeing yourself is as simple as looking in a mirror or pushing a button. Seeing Ourselves takes guests on a journey through the development of portraiture, photography, mirrors, and more to reveal how the modern selfie came to be.

Featuring approximately 55 objects, the exhibition includes more than 20 works of art, among them a collection of late 18th-century miniature portraits by Irish-born artist George Place, and a painting by Harold M. Mott Smith titled Their Last Meeting that commemorates Thomas Edison’s visit to Schenectady in 1922 where he met Charles Proteus Steinmetz, another trailblazer in the field of electricity. Early prototype X-ray equipment, rare photographs, a collection of cameras, and a model of the first GE Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machine are also on view.

Interactive activities include Capture Your Shadow, Colorize a Photograph, Get In The Scene, Face Mixer, Fool a Computer Vision System, and Make Your Bones Dance.